Bookmark our Freebies page for beautiful printables monthly.

©StephieMcCarthy

Dried Roses Tinted with Food Coloring

by Stephie McCarthy

©StephieMcCarthy

These rosy dried roses started out as a basket of faded, drab blossoms.

©StephieMcCarthy

Dyed with gel food coloring they make a vivid display
and won't fade. We can decorate with these for years.

©StephieMcCarthy

Here's what we found worked best:
Gel food coloring and a bit of liquid wax
rubbed on with a cotton swab.

©StephieMcCarthy

To duplicate this craft, you'll need:
• Gel food coloring in neon pink, green, and yellow
(other colors will work as well)
• Waverly Inspirations Clear Wax
(this is easy to find and used for sealing chalk paint projects)
• Cotton Swabs
• Water

©StephieMcCarthy

Here is a food coloring kit in neon colors —

buy food coloring

 

The clear wax by Waverly is available at Walmart.

We also had baby wipes, a spray bottle, paint brushes,
gloves, a drop cloth, and a vase to hold the roses for drying.

I'll show you what I discovered, but first …

©StephieMcCarthy

… here's a close up of dried roses before tinting …
And before that …

©StephieMcCarthy

… hanging to dry, fading a lot, and ending up
with a texture like crushed parchment paper.

©StephieMcCarthy

When I first conceived of using food coloring to dye the dried roses,
I tried it on various plants and realized that dried petals had
natural water-resistant surfaces. The water-based colors
beaded and looked unnatural.

©StephieMcCarthy

When I mixed the gel food coloring with liquid wax, the
color blended smoothly. I switched to a cotton swab
and the results were even better. Eureka!

©StephieMcCarthy

but oops … sometimes I used too much wax stain
and had to remove a lot with baby wipes.

©StephieMcCarthy

AND … if, after drying, there was just too much wax on
the rose and it looked like melted crayon, I found I could
dip it in a small cup of warm water (almost hot), and a lot
of the wax stain would come right off! That was good!

©StephieMcCarthy

I dabbed food coloring on those roses again, this time without
adding wax. I learned that the stain, although it
tended to bead at first, would slowly spread through the
petals as the roses dried.

©StephieMcCarthy

I tried dipping roses in water first then brushing
on the food coloring. The color beaded, but as the rose
dried it seemed to blend in, especially with a little extra brush work.
So, wax is not entirely necessary.

©StephieMcCarthy

But I loved the blending ability of the wax!
For these faded pink buds, I used the wax and gel formula and
a paint brush and boosted their color with pink, yellow, and
orange. Colorful and durable!

©StephieMcCarthy

I loved adding the waxy green stain near the stems, and even boosting
some of the leaf colors with green wax too.
A touch of green looked very natural.
Wipe it off until there is just a trace.

©StephieMcCarthy

I soon had a basket of vivid roses to use in decorating.
Starting from this …

©StephieMcCarthy

Beautiful, but now they will stand out much better …

©StephieMcCarthy

… and last for for a very long time!
Like true love …

– Shop with Sweet Home Stephie McCarthy –

Shop Stephie McCarthy shop Stephie McCarthy shop Stephie McCarthy

cards

©StephieMcCarthy

Click to see
new cards

Artist
© Stephie McCarthy

home décor

©StephieMcCarthy

Click to see
new decor

Artist
© Stephie McCarthy

 

printables

free seahorse printable

Click to see
new Printables

Artist
© Stephie McCarthy